this space intentionally left blank

July 23, 2014

Filed under: journalism»new_media

The Landslide

We've just released a new interactive I've been working on for a couple of weeks, this time exploring the Oso landslide earlier this year. Our timeline (source) shows... well, I'll let the intro text explain it:

The decades preceding the deadly landslide near Oso reflect a shifting landscape with one human constant: Even as warnings mounted, people kept moving in. This interactive graphic tells that story, starting in 1887. Thirteen aerial photographs from the 1930s on capture the geographical changes; the hill is scarred by a succession of major slides while the river at its base gets pushed away, only to fight its way back. This graphic lets you go back in time and track the warnings from scientists; the failed attempts to stabilize the hill; the logging on or near the unstable slope; and the 37 homes that were built below the hill only to be destroyed.

The design of this news app is one of those cases where inspiration struck after letting its idea percolate for a while. We really wanted to showcase the aerial photos, originally intending to sync them up with a horizontal timeline. I don't particularly care for timelines — they're basically listicles that you can't scan easily — so I wasn't thrilled with this solution. It also didn't work well on mobile, and that's a no-go for my Seattle Times projects.

One day, while reading through the patterns at Bocoup's Mobile Vis site, it occurred to me that a vertical timeline would answer many of these problems. On mobile, a vertical scroll is a natural, inviting motion. On desktop, it was easier to arrange the elements side-by-side than stacked vertically. Swapping the axes turned out to be a huge breakthrough for the "feel" of the interactive — on phones and tablets that support inertial scrolling for overflow (Chrome and IE), users can even "throw" the timeline up the page to rapidly jump through the images, almost like a flipbook. On desktop, the mouse wheel serves much the same purpose.

On a technical level, this project made heavy use of the app template's ability to read and process CSV files. The reporters could work in Excel, mostly, and their changes would be seamlessly integrated into the presentation, which made copy editing a cinch. I also added live reload to the scaffolding on this project — it's a small tweak, but in group design sessions it's much easier to keep the focus on my editor for tweaks, but let the browser refresh on another monitor for feedback. I used Ractive to build the timeline itself, but that was mostly just for ease of templating and to get a feel for it — my next projects will probably return to Angular.

All in all, I'm extremely happy with the way this feature turned out. The reporting is deep (in a traditional story, it would probably be at least 5,000 words), but we've managed to tell this story visually in an intuitive, at-a-glance format, across multiple device formats. Casual readers can flip through the photos and see the movement of the river (as well as the 2014 devastation), while the curious can dig into individual construction events and warning signs. It's a pretty serious chunk of interactive storytelling, but we're just getting started. If you or someone you know would like to work on projects like this, feel free to apply to our open news app designer and developer positions.

Future - Present - Past