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November 12, 2014

Filed under: tech»web

grunt-init component

Last week, I wrote a little bit about using custom elements for our election pages. Being able to interact with SVG maps using a simple DOM interface, while still annoying (it's SVG, after all) miles more pleasant than actually using the tags directly. At the end of that post, I recommended that newsrooms thinking about docreating new JavaScript libraries look into Web Components — or at least custom elements. This week, I've got a way to make good on that pitch.

Similar to our news app template, I've put together a Grunt scaffolding for creating bundled custom elements, including HTML templating and CSS, all in a single standalone file. It's our component template — or, as I like to call it, the Poor Journalist's Polymer.

As with the app template, I'm developing the component scaffolding by building projects with it and then integrating the improvements back in. The first is a responsive-frame element that serves as a smaller, easier-to-use replacement for NPR's Pym. I like Pym, and I've used it in several projects now, but it's a little buggy and the setup process is cumbersome. In contrast, the custom elements don't require any JavaScript skills: just include the script to start using them on the page, and they'll connect up with the child elements on the other side of the iframe automatically.

My second testbed project is a Leaflet map element that uses custom HTML to set the map configuration without ever writing a line of JSON (unless you really want to). It's intended to make mapping simple and fast for web producers, while still offering plenty of power for people like me who just want the boilerplate out of the way. Leaflet's a great candidate for this kind of declarative approach, and I think this is a really promising demo for the power of custom elements.

For standalone components like these, the template seems to be working well. I haven't yet solved the problem of easily embedding them in highly opinionated news apps, due to the way that dependencies are handled. It's useful for custom elements to be able to bundle their CSS and other assets into their package, similar to the way that HTML imports and shadow root offer embedded styles, but that means they may not integrate well into projects that already have their own build system. As far as I can tell, the best solution for now will probably be to load the packages from Bower and require() the standalone files from its build directory, which should work with whatever module system you like.

But to be clear, the component template isn't really intended to solve those problems. Its goal is to simplify and modernize the kinds of scripts that, even now, people tend to solve with a jQuery plugin. I'd like to change that, so that more newsrooms produce reusable HTML elements instead of JavaScript spaghetti code. If you build something interesting with the component template, or if it inspires you to make your own, please let me know!

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